How can I reduce my risk?

Cancer is one of the leading threats to health in BC. This year, more than twenty-two thousand British Columbians will be diagnosed with cancer, and over nine thousand will die of cancer.

However, up to 50% of cancers can be prevented. Modifiable risks include tobacco smoking, nutrition, alcohol consumption, sun protection, physical activity, and body weight, as well as occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogens, and infections.

The Centre of Excellence in Cancer Prevention conducts research on cancer prevention interventions. For more information on our current projects, see our research.

How can I prevent cancer?

Reducing cancer risk factors will significantly reduce the likelihood of getting cancer.

Here’s what you can do:

Consult with your physician before making any lifestyle changes. For more information on how to reduce your cancer risk, see our key cancer sources.

What are current Canadian risk factor statistics?

Following a healthy lifestyle can prevent at least half of all cancers. However, many Canadians are not making healthy choices to reduce their risk. We developed these charts to help researchers, community groups, practitioners, and others to better understand how Canadians can improve their health and reduce their cancer risk. We also wanted to provide a user-friendly resource for reports and presentations. We have provided data for major risks in one location, simplifying access.

We have prepared charts to present current cancer risk statistics for all provinces and territories, as available for the major cancer risk factors: alcohol, fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity, physical activity, UV exposure, and tobacco. These charts are available as high-resolution images for use in presentations and other application. The obesity maps are also available in an animated format (gif). To access these charts, see our resource section or see below.

Key cancer sources

Alcohol

Nutrition

Obesity

Occupational health

Environment and cancer

Physical activity

Sunlight

Tobacco

Infections